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Showing posts from June, 2010

Source code hosting sets pricing all wrong

Where's the love?
The way GitHub structured their pricing plan looks like a way to punish long-term customers.

They don't charge based on how much value they are providing: they just charge based on how much you must be willing to pay after your data starts gathering there. And they are not alone -- most other do the same wrong customer segmentation tricks.

Many small projects
It's good form to have separate repositories for separate projects, so with each new project hosted on GitHub you would create a new private repository.

Well -- pretty soon you will run out of private repositories so you'll need to upgrade to a new plan.

If you look at their pricing plans they are for 5, 10 and 20 private repositories, and then you get into the over $100/month business plans.

Am I silver business or micro ?
If I look at my own server, I have 34 mercurial repositories dating 2 years back alone. Of course, some are big, some are small, some represent my own ideas while other are repo…

Compiling is such a chore

I'm using Hudson as my build server and I would love to patch some things about it, especially the JUnit reports and charts.

Well, one of the reasons I dislike getting to this small change is that I would first:
need to checkout Hudson,
then figure out how to build it,
then do the patch,
then compile it and finally
start using the changed Hudson.Thus, there are quite a few things that stop you from doing the smallest changes, and I would say the biggest culprit is that you have to compile the code. In a scripting language:
I would not need to checkout anything as the installed sources are everything I need.
There would be no "build" rules.
The patch would be done in-place.
There would be no "compilation" step and
There would be no "deploy" step so I can start using the new Hudson right away.So while I dislike PHP, for example, as it seems too easy to break anything, having a strong typed, compiled language does hinder the desire to do small changes.

Imagine ho…

Forget the removable battery, what about the easily removable hard drive? (Get well soon, trusty mac!)

Get well soon, trusty Mac

Last Wednesday my MacBook Pro's display stopped working. Actually, it might be the logic board since the fans do seem to start but nothing else happens: it needs to be sent to an Apple Service. (It could also be that wide-spread NVidia problem MacBook Pros had, who knows).

Anyhow, I had to migrate some data to a new machine I received this morning.

I have bought about a month ago an Intel SSD hard drive so I already knew how to dismantle the laptop. This time I just had to swap the hard drive of the replacement machine with my own SSD drive and I was back to work. Well, one hour later anyhow.

User serviceable

This whole experience made me think how convenient it really is to have user-serviceable components. As laptops basically replace desktops, it's important to be able to access hardware in your laptop.

Actually, not everything is important, there are 2 big things that matter: RAM and hard drive. RAM access is just a nice to have feature since add…